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i want to now recognize the chairman of the higher education and workforce committee mr. kline for five minutes. >> thank you madam chair into the witnesses for being here. you are quite excellent. how does your idea looking at your testimony would require students to take the azt or the sat and meet the threshold scores based on the gpa. i listened to the testimony and you talk about how you have a greater success rate if they have had a high school education and so forth. i do not understand how this would work for the millions of what we are still calling nontraditional students, people going back to the community college or for-profit school or something like that to get a particular skill. .. to find an alternative way to achieve standards. for example, after one semester of satisfactory academic proprogress in a community college they become reeligible even if not under rigorous high school standards. >> so if they had the low s.a.t., act they have to go the first semester not qualifying for a pell grant. but if they demonstrated then academic capability they would be? >>
millions of other families that, what's wrong with mom? it was not the education about alcoholism and drug dependency that there is now. it took dad -- dad searched through several doctors before finding a doctor that had the courage to say your wife's an alcoholic. that was not just the image anybody accepted. found the right doctor, dad -- excuse me -- had the courage to say we're going to do this intervention, the whole family went in, did the intervention with mom, and, you know, at that time, i never heard the word "intervention," and now you got tv shows that do it. it was a different time. we did it. dad led the intervention, and my memory of that is very clear. he walked in the door that morning, all the kids, dad, surprised mom, took her hand and said, betty, we're here because we love you, the kids want their mother back, i want my wife back, and those interventions are tough. i mean, that is tough, hard, hard, hard work. a lot of tears. a lot of crying. a lot of raised voices. a lot of hugs, more raised voices, denial, and not denial, and i mean, it goes back and forth. it's a t
income students who were pursuing a higher education was less than half of today. we'll cut the gap between lower and upper income students. making agrant is livesence to millions of has been discussed in reference to access. pell grant recipients have less than this. after you add scholarship aid or what ever they are expected to -- out of your park it pocket, he still has $11,000 to pay for one year of higher education. their feeling that with loans, additional work, eating ramen noodles. the students are living on the edge. if you do not cut pell grant funding, the students in the range, you run two major risks. some will not pursue higher education. are a number of students are academically prepared to go to four-year institutions while under much down to two-year areitutions where they substantially less likely to complete. in doing with the long-term i think this is appropriate and targeted spending reductions in areas that are not linked to needy students are directly. and pursues a ribbon. i have listed a host of offset options in my testimony. i will just throw out one with
education act? >> yes, one of the was and it permitted daily attendance process and we tide that process so that if a student is but a circle time right now, before that money will the process goes over to check to see that student has in fact started attending the class that the aid is going to be paying for. if they have not had an attendance record, the financial aid does not go through so we have closed the loophole between students eligible for class. >> and the students are fully aware of that? >> yes, they are. and every semester him as you might imagine, we do have a faculty that does not record attendance and a student comes in wanting to know where their money is. so it is a way to close that gap and the other thing that we have done, this is for all of our students that are only online, prior to dispersing funds it gives us a list of all of those students and we have seen multiple students coming from the name address and we would not disperse this, we would do a further check and this includes a father-son or something akin to that. that we have not had multiple students coming
that a first lady could have by being herself, by shining the light on a dark corner, by educating the public. >> next up we'll listen to president ford himself announcing the results of her surgery. >> i just returned from the hospital where i saw betty as she came from the operating room . the doctor assured me that she came through the operation all right. [applause] it's been a difficult 36 hours which our faith will sustain us and betty would expect me to be here. >> in a few weeks i will complete my chemotherapy treatments and that will be another milestone for me. since that first year i have not talked much about the difference of my experience with cancer. and t the my mast tecttoim the mastectomy and the discussion about it i was glad to see it because it prompted a large number of women to go and get checkups in their local communities. it made my recup relation easier because i knew that i was helping others. i make this progress report to help cheer up those who have just had an operation for cancer and to encourage them to keep up their good spirit. part of the battle against ca
education president. here are the dismal results of the organization for economic cooperation and development global test. the mouthful. fifteen euros in countries and large economies. in mathematics there is no surprise. singapore, hong kong, taiwan, south korea. yes. here we are. we are 26 on this list. thirty-four jurisdictions. in been reading a little bit of an improvement, shanghai, here we go again, ranking first followed by hong kong, singapore, south korea. the united states, a little better there. that is pretty good. it puts us in the middle. shanghai ranks first followed by sean -- hong kong. singapore and japan in science. the united states is better at science that we are math. anyway. the fact of the matter is we are 21st. there is no good news. i was trying to think away to make that -- make you feel better about that, but it is not going to happen. hard to believe that american exception was and continues into the next generation with test results like these raising the question, does it? joining us now, a veteran political consultant, national review columnis
online already. martha: disappointing news about america's education system. according to the latest survey when it comes to major subjects like math, reading and signs, u.s. teenagers fall ray behind their counter parts in asia and europe. gregg palkot is live in london to tell us more about these results. >> reporter: the international report card for schools is out. it comes from the well-regarded oedd. while we don't get an f it feels like a c. our teenagers are 20th in the world in reading skills and a as for math, 28 other countries are ahead of our teenagers. here is what they have to say about our results. >> at the end of the day quality of outcome and quality of education can never exceed the quality of instruction. >> reporter: we have had a statement from the education secretary. he calls it a picture of stagnation. while things have not gotten worse. our rankings have split because others have gotten better'. chinese cities like beijing and hong kong lead the way. in a heating unglobal economy strong numbers. martha: we are spending more money, we have more technology be
on and on with this lock em up mentality and people nod their heads. if people are better educated about these issues they will call the people on the carpet and say wait a minute. i think the mission, if i can give you that, would be to step outside your circle, your work circle and bring this issue to the broader public so they can create a change in the culture and the public's response to these issues that will then enable the politicians and legislators to make the reforms to the finances and the court's etc that really need to happen and one way i think is a good way to do that and i'm talking, i'm a journalist, an advocacy journalist, it's usually said with a sneer but i wear the badge proudly, to reach out to reporter's because of course they do have that soapbox to share these stories with. so reach out to reporter's in your local newspapers, crime reporter's, whoever, and just invite them to spend the day with you. invite them to spend a day looking at just a day in your life as a public defender, a day in the life of you as a parole officer, whatever it is. and it's a tradition journalist
. >> the idea that a child may never escape the poverty because they lack decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own, it should offend all of us and compel us to action. we are a better country than this. let me repeat: the combined trends of increased inequality and decreasing mobility pose a fundamental threat to the american dream, our way of life and what we stand for around the globe. >> there's a public polling unit and it was found that the president's approval rating among a core constituency that got him elected, that 19-24-year-old, a 41% approval rating. most concerning for the affordable care act is the poll asked young people will they enroll in the affordable care act. this group of young invincibles is key to have their involvement to make it work. 47% of the millennials 18-29 said they will not enrol. 57% it's approved. greater than the national average among the entire population. >> mike viqueira at the white house. >>> to illustrate the gap the highest 1% saw income rise an average of 31%. for everybody else it was less than one ha
pr and a push to get young folks engaged in the process and education is going to be the key way to solving the low enrollment and lack of enthusiasm around the law. >> not enough pr, that is what we're hearing this morning. i'll let you respond to that. also, as part of the polling, this comes from united technologies congressional connection poll. about -- actually, more than half of these young people, 18 to 29 who were surveyed said, they actually think the law is going to get repealed. whether that's reality or not, it's the perception. if they think that after three-plus years of what most of us would argue there's been pr, how in the world do you convince them at this point to sign up? >> absolutely, shannon. i think what this really shows is millenials are a whole lot smarter than president obama thinks they are. they have looked at the choices and, as this poll shows, they are not really interested. he catapulted to his presidency by taking this group of people for granted and as much as i think young people want to see some sort of health care reform, they are not reall
is it the education outcomes continue to decline when we increase federal control year after year after year but yet our outcomes continue to decline? even this week, another international poll coming out for that. why is it getting harder to start a company, find a job, pay your gas bill? why is it hard to fill up your gas and pay your cell phone? it's increasing fees and control and americans continue to get frustrated because they know this is not what we were designed to be. we're doing too many things. we've got to get back to trusting the american people, our state leaders, our local leaders and we've got to set the standard for what leadership looks like in america by our rhetoric and by our actions. we can honor people and honor each other even in our differences, but we've got to get back to doing this nation's business the way that american people in their heart know it should be done, where their voices are heard and where they get to make the decisions. with that i yield back. . the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. miller, for five minutes. mr.
talks about education in the u.s.. >> being lady like does not require silence. why should my husband's job or yours prevent us from being ourselves? i do not believe that being first lady should prevent me from expressing my ideas. [applause] >> betty ford spoke her mind, pro choice and a supporter of the equal rights amendment. she and gerald ford openly discussed her experience with breast cancer. for much of her family's public life she struggled with alcohol and drug dependency and confronting it defined her post white house years. >> welcome to first ladies influence and image. tonight we'll tell you the story of elizabeth ford, the wife of president gerald ford. here to tell her story is richard norton smith. you know him, he's one of our academic advisors for the whole project. he's helped launch a number of presidential libraries among them the gerald r. ford library in michigan. you developed a relationship with the fords so you bring that to the table. >> sure. i try to be as objective as possible. but i was very fortunate to become a good friends of both of the fords. >> w
health care and education. modernizing infrastructure. and healing. >> his close relationship with leaders like muammar gaddafi and castro drew criticism, he still visited the white houses meeting with three sitting american properties. in 2002 george w. bush presented him with the presidential medal of freedom. barack obama met nelson mandela in 2005, when barack obama was a senator. after one term as president nelson mandela stepped down. he did not slow his pace. his charitable foundation raised money for a number of causes. >> when south africa hosted the world cup tournament in 2010, he made his last public appearance. the crowd honoured him to thunderous ovation. >> his third wife, graca machel, former first lady of mozambique, was at his side during prostate cancer and lingering lung infections. >> never and never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. and suffer the indignity of being the skunk of the world. the sun never set on so glorious a human achievement. let freedom rain. god bless africa. >> nelson man
at the town hall education. the art and recreation campus. what we are looking at is the president of the american center for progress. she is offering opening statements. the president is expected to walk up to the podium any minute now. when he gets up there he is expected no the to talk about any specific policy. the changes or announcements or proposals. instead he will urge congress to pass a budget and extend unemployment insurance by the end of the year. the president will now address a full audience. >> thank you so much. thank you, everybody. please have a seat. sharing a story that resonated with me and there a lot of parallels in my life and resonated with some of you. over the past years, the center for american progress has done incredible work to shape the debate over expanding opportunity for all americans. i could not be more grateful not only for giving me a lot of policy ideas, but a lot of staff. my friend john ran my transition. my chief of staff dennis mcdonough did the cap. you guys are doing a good job training folks. i want to thank all the members of congre
as to what they can do. if you have just a high school education -- i only had a high school education. the jobs were there when i came out of high school. it was not i thought. a kid with a high school education is pretty much in a deadlocked situation now. if he can even get a job. that is what needs to be done in my personal opinion. host: david in florida. caller: good morning. i believe that you are totally impartial and the way you do your job. thank you. i agree with a lot of what this gentleman was saying with regard to manufacturing. they are talking about raising the minimum wage to stimulate the economy. what are they consider stimulating the economy? putiding jobs for kids to something on the shelf at walmart? we don't make anything. it goes back to china. as far as the raising of the minimum wage, what people fail to realize is that when they raise it here and there -- to the average guy getting it, it is not that much money in his pocket every week. collectively throughout the nation, that is a whole lot more money that the government can tax and take from you. if they ra
efficiencies, how we support education. >> i want to get to that in a moment. you have a long, deeply personal relationship with howard that dates back 25 years, when you were just 16. tell us the story of what brought you to howard university. >> at the age of 16, i was probably 80 pounds. i suffered from sickle cell anemia. i came to howard university because howard had a sickle cell center. my mom, a nurse, thought it would be a safe place healthwise. the second reason is because i wanted to pursue becoming a physician. i looked across the spectrum of universities that would give me that opportunity, howard had the best fit. my former prime minister, founder, father of our nation, as it were, who brought us into independence was a political professor at howard university. it has a strong name in the caribbean and was a strong connection for me. >> you come from trinidad and tobego. >> that is correct. >> you are a surgical oncologist by training. are you still practicing? >> on a limited basis. my operating room, my classroom as it were, day-to-day activities of administration plus my skill
american education policy in connecticut. >> on august 9, 1974 vice president ford was sworn in as president of the united states. this is the dress that ms. ford was wearing at the swearing in ceremony. she was less than excited about becoming first lady but president ford encouraged her saying we can do this. she resolved if i have to do this, i'm going to have fun doing it. within 10-days she had a state dinner to entertain king hussein of jordan. she had to prepare for that as her role of first lady and she hit the ground running. first lady betty ford monday night at 9:00 eastern. >> next is constitution and role judges with supreme court thomas. this is from the 2013 lawyer's convention in washington, d.c. it's a little less than an hour. >> thank you, david. could evening, everyone. it is my great honor and pleasure to introduce our distinguished guest this evening. although much of what i might say by way of introduction is no doubt familiar to all of you. justice clarence thomas has served with great distinction on the united states supreme court for more than two de
faith and insistence on the importance of education, and his personal dignity and strength in the face of the injustices of the segregated south taught our supreme court justice everything he needed to know to meet the challenges and opportunities that were ahead of him. the sisters at saint benedict and saint pius added a few things too. [laughter] initially, young clarence thomas was called to the priesthood and he entered the seminary. the call gradually lost its strength and a bigoted comment by another extinguished his determination. -- his location -- his vocation. in fall 1968, he enrolled at holy cross college. yale law school came next. after earning the elite degree, he had difficulty finding a big- city law firm job. so he accepted an offer from the attorney general of missouri and served as an assistant attorney general in jefferson city from 1974 to 1977. after a brief stint in corporate law, he followed the then senator danforth to washington, d.c. in 1979, just in time for the reagan revolution. over the next dozen years, clarence thomas served in all three branches of g
are much more highly educated and well trained. they are dealing with complex software systems and they are costing more because we invest a lot more in them and it costs more to retain them. there are opportunities in the private sector that are greater. part of the thing driving these military personnel costs to some degree is the technological advancement and the fact that we are expecting -- what we are expecting out of them in terms of training and performance is higher than it was 23 years ago. host: earlier you mentioned the cost of military pay. a "new york times" op-ed last month suggested that military pay should be put on the table. host: do you think it is likely that pay would be a target as the pentagon looks to cut costs? guest: i think that pay as a target is an interesting idea. i don't think anyone is going to flat-out reduce military pay. "the new york times" editorial notes this is a politically and emotionally fraught area of the budget to be debating. i cannot imagine an area where people would be saying you are going to be getting less than this year. wha
that today or tomorrow. the operator did survive. he was injured. educated that he tried to apply the brakes, that the train was coming into the curve quickly and he tried to apply the brakes. they want to see what that operator has to say. the speed in that part of the rail should have been 30 miles an hour. the train would have needed to slow from 70-mile an hour on the straight away to that 30 miles an hour. did that happen? investigators will be back on the rails today to try to look at the rails and the crumbled cars themselves to see what they can learn from that. >> ok. lisa stark reporting to us from washington. thank you. >> metro north has been working to prevent accidents. we have a look at some prior accidents in the mta history. >> it carries more than 82 million people a year, which is the busiest in the country. it's part of new york's metropolitan transportation authority. it is a system of subways, buses and commuters trains. the deadliest crash was in 1918 when a subway driver lost control in brooklyn. the last time passengers were killed in an m.t. the a. crash was 1991 wh
: the education system, the job system is not treating all americans equally. you see that in the minority numbers. some of the callers have talked about this. anyou're going into environment where you are the orst person of this race gender in that role, how much more difficult is it for you to break in as opposed to a workforce that is more diverse? host: you look at the overall but the number%, approaches numeral seven percent because of the increase in african-american unemployed and teenagers. correct? guest: that is part of the factors. you have much higher unemployment among minorities and younger people. you also look at it based on educational breakdowns. the unemployment rate is considerably higher among those who have not completed high school compared to those who have completed college. work isic morath's available online. thank you for being with us. coming up next, the vice president is back in the u.s. following a weeklong trip that included stops in china, south korea, and japan. we will have david lampton joining us from johns hopkins to discuss the state of relations between the
the questions. sallie mae also is the biggest u.s. student lender. loans to student of on education from the 2012 program for international student assessment, an exam given to 15-year-old worldwide shows the 90 students lagging in math and just average in reading. american students fail to place in the top 20 in any category. education secretary arne duncan calls the result "picture of educational stagnation coastal but added we must invest in early education, raise academic standards, and do more to notchit and obtain top- educators. top scoring teams are in singapore, south korea, japan, and hong kong. an update on the new york city ormuter train derailment reporting investigators believe the operator of the train involved in the jarrell meant on sunday fell asleep prior to the incident. william rockefeller all but admitted he dozed off. sources say he was, in their words, jolted from a sleep and hit the break. but he did not have enough time to stop the train as they headed into a curve rated for only 30 miles an hour at a speed of greater than 82 miles per hour. four people were kil
experience or they will exchange out for education, for a couple of the years. a lot of people coming out of college may have part-time jobs elsewhere or going through a difficult economic time with the job market that it has recently been, how do we have the ability to get that experience? a lot of young people are looking for jobs to be able to get that experience and learn obvious job training that maybe they are not getting through their college career. what is your college background and are you still paying off college loans? caller: i am. i just finished my masters degree. i am currently employed at i has been in the job market, i have been in the professionals setting since i was 16 years old. i spent a lot of time building that experience, maybe not making as much as other people. if i am thankful i have had that ability to get that experience. i am finding a lot of young people participate in clubs and organizations, whether or not they are getting paid or getting whatever they can to get a tiny bit of experience on their resume. aret of companies out there looking for 5, 10, 10
to education. he could have stayed in his community, but he saw -- he started to see himself as an african, not just as a hoso, he started to see himself and see how the white regime was dividing people by stressing ethnic differences and he was able to overcome that. i think that's such an extraordinary thing. >> it's true. it's true. he was a courageous human being and full of the idea that he was on a journey, and he had something to do, he had a place to be, and it's fabulous to realize that there's an old spiritual, old gospel song which is i'm on my journey now, mount zion, on my journey now, mount zion, and i wouldn't take nothing, mount zion, from my journey. mount zion. he was on the journey and he knew it and he had something to do. and this is what each of us has, if we have enough courage, we can say i'm on a journey, i have a charge to keep. >> you were living in cairo with your husband, south african freedom fighter when you first met nelson mandela. i understand your husband and mandela were something of rivals, but that didn't matter to mandela. tell us about that experienc
of the dynamics here, why this is happening? are hospitals doing their part to help to educate people as far as what's going on with this? >> they are. they are working hard to let people know what the dynamic is. part of the debate has to be not just about hospitals and governors but the business communities in these places saying if we're going to be competitive, if we're doing to have a strong educated workforce that can go to work in the morning and be health y, we have to make sure we support essential hospitals in every way we can. that business community has got to step up to the plate in these states. >> doctor, thank you so much for your time. >> thank you. >>> coming up new details in yesterday's early morning train wreck that left four dead. we'll have an update after the break. if i can impart one lesson to a new business owner, it would be one thing i've learned is my philosophy is real simple american express open forum is an on-line community, that helps our members connect and share ideas to make smart business decisions. if you mess up, fess up. be your partners best partner
. i'm just trying to safe you a little money. my job is not just to entertain you, but to educate you. so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. leave it to twitter to produce the ultimate question that is defining this stock market. including today where the dow sank 78 points. s&p back 7.2%. at jim query, would you buy amazon here? my quick response, two very different questions, yes and no. that's right. yes, i would buy amazon. no, it's not worth $400. welcome to the world of bull market discipline. the discipline to buy stocks that aren't cheap but are right. a discipline that will be tested in the next few days. at last because of today's last hour 7 sell-off -- >> sell, sell, sell! >> that shook people out of their complacency. i'm talking about the rigger to recognize what the market actually wants, though, not necessarily what you want. the dichotomy says you would rather have a portfolio that is hated and making money than be bound by concerns that may not be as relevant as they should be. let's start with amazon, which hit at an all-time high today, $399 before being repelled along wit
are helping to assure that that kid over there who's not my kid has a chance at a good education or that guy over there who i'm not related to has a chance at a decent job and a decent retirement, i'm going to be better off. i'm going to be living in a society that is more cohesive and is, you know, going to create the kind of future for our kids that we all want. >> jonathan, it was so powerful. he's not a catholic. he's obviously been paying attention to what the pope has been saying about social justice. not talking about abortion so much or the issues that have been dominating in my religion so often. but talking about the old christian principles. looking out for poor people. saying the lowest person you meet is in the worst position. that basic christianity. and i was taken, in fact, he's been paying attention to that. he sure has. >> right. the key thing is while the president's not a catholic, he is a christian. and when you listen to his speeches, when you listen to what he says whether it's health care or the economy, a lot of it is based in these, the ones who are struggling paych
was absolutely passionate about education, and he had a great affinity with children, because remember, 27 years in prison, he hardly saw a child. and it was the one thing he said he really missed was the touch of a child. so he paid a lot of attention to the youth. and as you say, democracy here in south africa, the anniversary of those first democratic elections is next year, it was 20 years ago. so a lot of people, a lot of these people here didn't know apartheid, didn't know about the feel, the indignities of it, but they still know that nelson mandela made sacrifices for them. and the key is -- and he was very, very passionate about it -- he wanted his legacy to live on way after he had gone. and dethat he did that, "you ca like me in a small way. it's not hard to be nelson mandela. just pay attention to the people close to you and keep on trying hard and never give up." that in a way is his legacy. >> and they are living his legacy out. robin, thank you. appreciate it. >> reporter: okay. >>> one of the icons of new york honored nelson mandela last night. look at this. the top of the empire
in the field of agriculture and agricultural education. thank you, mr. speaker and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. waxman, for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much, mr. speaker. on february 15, a small group of democratic members of the house joined together to form the safe climate caucus. we vowed to come to the house every day to talk about the defining environmental challenge of our time, climate change. today marks the 100th day we have spoken on the house floor. the safe climate caucus is composed of representatives from across this country. we come from the west coast, the east coast, the north and the south and the midwest. we come from coastal regions, urban areas and rural communities. we represent a cross-section of america. we started the safe climate caucus because of the enormous disconnect that exists between what scientists are telling us about the dangers of climate change and the conspiracy of silence and denial that exists in this house. there is a mou
is to remove the barriers that students may see that impact their education in a negative way. >> danielle gill, wusa9. >> well, still to come, the issues congress will be dealing with over the next two days and weeks could take a big bite out of your wallet. topper? >> well, the high and low today we had a break in terms of temperatures. it's a harbinger of things to come. officially 57 was the high. 40 was the low. averages are now down to 50 and 36. i'll mention this again, sunset 4:46. that's as early as it sets and it won't change until december 12th. we'll come back and talk about a spring to winter forecast in a bit. >> but first, getting creative while trying to help people cross the street safely. >>> while we give you new information about being loud in fairfax county. the fairfax county board of supervisors unanimously passed an ordnance last night to let police ticket you if your party is too loud. that would be a misdemeanor offense and come with a fine of up to $500. >>> they are on pace to break the annual gun sales record and some of that credit goes to a pretty brisk business o
in the air about all of this. i take this from an educational point of view. our people to on see who was being subversive to our government, who was working with foreign interests. this is nothing new. unfortunately the nsa, as much as we hate it and it leaves a to taste, they have a job do. when you take a look at multimedia, like facebook, twitter, so on and so forth, you have people constantly pushing one side or the other and if they are following these little groups online and nobody knows who these groups are. now that facebook is a public , who is spending the money to antagonize people to take extreme size of -- extreme --es of republican, democrat if you take a look at what is out there, it is extremely hateful, extremely pointed, and a violent tone. why are people having such a the time understanding that government has a job to protect its people? if you are going to put something stupid out there you are responsible for your actions. host: will any of these surveillance disclosures changed the way you use social media like facebook? caller: no. the bottom line is if i am
, health and human services, education committee irs some of the social security and small business administrations, as well as a number of other federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. veterans are counting on us to solve these challenges. operates at, v.a. large health care -- integrated health care systems, may be one of the larger ones in the country, on hundred 51 medical centers, 871 clinics, 300 vet centers, and i know there are 70 mobile outreach clicks that reach out into the most rural areas defined veterans who live remotely. over 1700 remote access points nationwide. beyond health care, v.a. revised $10 billion in education assistance annually, second only to the department of education. v.a. guarantees nearly 1.8 million home loans, the only zero-down into the inner nation, and our foreclosure rate is lowest among all categories of mortgage loans. as the ninth largest life insurance and price, with 6.7 million clients and 95% customer saxes faction -- satisfaction rating. to the support of the congress and the leadership of the president and the invites an
saw it and were going to get some folks out here take care of it with and do a little education >> and with a few minutes siren sfpd solos were on the scene educating nats: and if you look at the spot right here you are not suppose to enter till right here how do you tell the difference there is a line right there in the street right there maligned and enforcing the rules of the bike lanes. nats: all the way to the right >> these dedicated bike lanes are for bicylist unless you are about to park but you can't cruse the bike lane looking for a spot you can only merge when there is a break in the bike lanes a break simiilar to this muni buses are not allowed to use the bike lanes to keep on schedule bike lanes are for bikes >> this guy gave me a piece of his mind after being caught in the bike and receiving a >> i teach journalism at the univeristy and im serious about this i don't see you being part of the solution i see you getiing some good film. so there you have it he was diving illegally in the bike lane and it's my fault . >> state law prohibits people from driving in the b
of education, and his personal dignity and strength in the face of the injustices of the segregated south taught our supreme court justice everything he needed to know to meet the challenges and opportunities that were ahead of him. the sisters at saint benedict and saint pius added a few things, too. [laughter] initially, young clarence thomas was called to the priesthood and he entered the seminary. the call gradually lost its strength and a bigoted comment by another extinguished his vocation. he left the seminary. in fall 1968, he enrolled at holy cross college. yale law school came next. after earning the elite degree, he had difficulty finding a big- city law firm job. so he accepted an offer from the attorney general of missouri and served as an assistant attorney general in jefferson city from 1974 to 1977. after a brief stint in corporate law, he followed the then senator danforth to washington, d.c. in 1979, just in time for the reagan revolution. over the next dozen years, clarence thomas served in all three branches of government. as a legislative aide to senator danforth, as
out of this government. there is not enough education for them and the jobs aren't plentiful enough, the pay is not plentiful, the housing is substandard. they feel they have not made any progress and in many cases they have stopped hoping for it. they said we need another government. there is a lot of pride in nelson mandela but there remains mostly because of economics a lot of advertis dissatisfaction. in his time or in his memory he hasn't been able to bridge the economic gap. tony. >> ali velshi. thank you. jonathan betz is here. jonathan. >> it is going to be a who's who of royals, celebrities, a leader of every major country will be in south africa, 100 have rscped so far. the queen of gland can't make it but david cameron can. mandela also close with cuba so its president, rool castro, -- raul castro will be there. hassan rouhani is coming. put not israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. he is concerned about the high security cost. >>> the dalai lama will be there. ful of johannesburg wip be shut down. an entire airport will be set aside for just the vips. security will
required that all patent applications be reviewed by patent examiners when a scientific education. people who understand the technology that the patent covers. this helps to ensure that patents are not issued for inventions that are already in the public domain. or that would be obvious to a person who is skilled in the technology. under the gentleman from california's amendment, however, an applicant could short circuit the entire patent examination's process and present his evidence of patentibility for the first time in district court. now, i have known many district judges who are excellent lawyers, but very few of them have degrees in biotechnology. very few have degrees in electrical engineering. yet under this amendment these judges would be making the initial determination whether, for example, a purported computer invention is novel and nonobvious, and whether it has been properly enabled. i would ask my colleagues, is there anyone here who believes that the united states will issue higher quality patents if the applications are never, never, never reviewed by an examiner with a
children and 6 educators in newtown, connecticut. who knows, perhaps that position will soften tomorrow when congress can hear for the first time the 911 recordings from inside sandy hook elementary on that fateful day. the connecticut state attorney has decided not to appeal last week's ruling to release the tapes, allowing them to be made public tomorrow afternoon, as planned. we'll have more on the 911 calls in tomorrow's broadcast. and while we don't know what exactly is on those recordings, maybe, just maybe, the sound of horror will force congress to think twice about gun reform in the new year. stay with us. it's mission impossible in today's top lines. don't take the bait. >> has the president signed up for obama care or the affordable care act? >> i don't have an update for you on that. i know that he will, and has said that he will. and the white house has said he will. but i don't have an update. >> do you know what he's waiting for, and when he does do that, will he make it open press? >> i'll get back to you. [ male announcer ] here's a question for you. if every u.s. home
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. it's donut friday at the office. aso every friday morning they psend me out to get the goods. but what they don't know is that i'm using my citi thankyou card at the coffee shop, so i get 2 times the points. and those points add up fast. so, sure, make me the grunt. 'cause i'll be using those points to help me get to a beach in miami. and allllllll the big shots will be stuck here at the cube farm. the citi thankyou preferred card. now earn 2x the points on dining out and entertainment, with no annual fee.to apply, go to citi.com/thankyoucards >>> i'm milissa rehberger. a union official says the engineer of a train that derailed in new york caught himself nodding off just before a sharp curve. >>> a federal judge says detroit can declare bankruptcy. it allows detroit to cut employee pensions. lawmakers in illinois passed a bill overhauling the state's pension system which is $100 billion in debt. the measure in part cuts benefits to workers and retirees. back to "hardball." ♪ >>> welcome back to "hardball." after the republi
crohnsandcolitisadvocates.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. >>> welcome back to "the ed show." this is the story for the folks who take a shower after work. where people of all races where allowed to participate. his activism moved his nation away from its racist separatist apartheid history toward one where every vote counts. nearly two decades later, our country which was founded on democracy is still struggling with voters' rights and suppression based on age, race, and class. republican lawmakers around the country are working hard to chip away at voting rights. even the supreme court, especially in key swing states like ohio. ohio went for president obama in both of the last two presidential elections. voters had to endure some of the longest lines in the country to cast their ballots. after striking down key provisions of the voting rights act, republicans are doing everything in their power to turn every state red this way. now, republicans are especially worried about our next guest. ohio state senator nina turner has gained in popula
connell said the other week that as they say in kentucky, there's no education in the second kick of a mule. and i think he certainly regards this as another shutdown as a second kick of the mule. and i think not only mitch who felt that way for some time, but all those loud voices from ted cruz especially from mike lee, from rand paul, from et cetera, you don't hear them right now. as you said, they're making some noises about how we don't want to trade sequester cuts unless there's a firm guarantee amended mandatory spending cuts. we don't want the extension of unemployment insurance. but these are discussions of actual details of a possible budget plan, not the sort of throwing down the gauntlet kind of, we're going to shut the whole joint down, thing we were hearing. you're not hearing that at all. and i think at least temporarily the biggest names in the tea party -- there's 20 people in the house who signed that letter. frankly, those are the last drags in the bottom of the teacup. they don't mean a whole lot. it's the rand pauls, ted cruzs, mike lees who matter. and they are conspicu
, i think we suspend a lot of time talking about the weaknesses and failures of our education system. clearly we're in a crisis moment. what i felt wasn't taking place in our pub leg conversation as much as what we're doing right and where there are success stories and there are wonderful success stories all over the country. so the aim and the purpose of the book was really to invite leaders into the class roovps of teachers doing incredible work that are achieving in spite of systemic issues and problems and that are really finding innovative and unique solutions to you beubiquetous problems. >> they all stand out, obviously. >> jason chung is a teacher in philadelphia who is in his fourth year of teaching and he entered the profession. that was his first job and he was told that he would have $100 for his entire annual budget to teach at seven different schools percussion. and his solution was not to climb into bed, pull the covers over his head and not come out. his solution was to go to home depot and boy paint buckets, which he then taught his students to drum only. so he's cre
education advocacy group in the district. i was wondering if you have any suggestions for early career scientists. how should we keep moving forward in these next couple of years? it is going to remain tough, even if we reach some sort of a deal. are the voice that i am most concerned about. i am glad you are moving in science policy. we need expertise there. many people in your situation would like to continue to do research and are finding it challenging to identify the path forward for them to do so. nih, we're doing everything we can to provide that kind of support. we are increasing the grants that are a bridge between a postdoctoral fellowship and an independent faculty position. we are making it possible for individuals that come in for their first nih grant application to only compete against each other instead of the established investigators that may have more of a track record. trying to give first-time investigators a leg up. thatl have to recognize while this is a historic downturn, the case for nih support is so strong, support for nih is so strong across parties and hous
companies have generated a lot of interest in genomics and have helped to educate individuals about the importance of dna and the genome as part of their medical care. at the same time, it is not entirely clear what information is useful to patients in the absence of being cared for by a physician or pharmacist or a nurse or another health care professional. these are things we're grappling with. our institute takes this very seriously. we study the ethical, legal, and social implications of genomic hand-in-hand with the supporting these studies. many issues need to be considered if we are going to use genomics is part of routine medical care in a sound and safe way. host: our last question is from mary ann would bridge -- in woodbridge, virginia. caller: good morning. thank you for your research. is your research leading to dna --ng able to predict sometimes it will skip a .eneration or so it would be interesting to see if your research can or will eventually lead to being able to predict this. host: thank you. would like to sort of managed expectations here. right now we can read
, newtown police officers are lecturing on the law enforcement circuit, educating police officers on what not only they say but what they think could be a better process. >> wow. >> that's right, brooke. if you go back to the psychological autopsy we just did on adam lanza, that gave us a plethora of information as to what may be in the minds of these young people, of these mass shooters, so that we can try to avoid this, identify, and work with it to prevent this sort of tragedy, if we can, in the future. >> dr. jeff gardere, steve kardian, thank you both very much. i want to read this from the newtown bee. they said the best way to honor the loves ones and youngsters who lost live s is to take care of someone in the community. in 30 minutes, we'll see how the nation's thinking on gun control has changed since the mass shooting. we'll go in depth about national polls, how everyone is feeling after this? that's at the bottom of the hour. stay with me for that. >> i want to move along and talk about the new details on how actor paul walker and his friend roger rodas died in that car crash
to the young children, six educators were killed when adam lanza went on his deadly rampage. newtown school superintendent is warning parents to limit their media exposure. he says these calls could be an emotional trigger. the anniversary of the shooting is december 14th. john, diana? >> thank you. >>> a 14-year-old boy in massachusetts is pleading not guilty to murdering his math teacher. phillip chism is accused in the october death of 24-year-old colleen ritzer. he had pleaded not guilty in a lower court but had to do so again yesterday because his case had been moved to massachusetts superior court. chism is being held without bail. >>> a man charged with killing a tsa agent in los angeles international airport last month is facing justice. the courtroom sketch shows the bandages on his neck. he didn't enter a plea yesterday. three people were wounded. he faces the death penalty if convicted. >>> new court documents show toronto mayor ford may have tried to buy a video that appears to show him smoking crack. the documents suggest that ford may have offered suspected drug dealing gang m
treatment. >>> sobering news today on where the united states ranks when it comes to education. last year more than a half million students from 65 countries took a two hour test for international student assessment and the u.s. ranked 36th overall and even more troubling since 2009, the country's rank in math, science and reading have all dropped. teens in shanghai china scored the highest. >> who has the foulest mouths in the land? according to a new study, it's the people in the state of ohio. a marketing firm analyzed more than 600,000 phone calls from the last 12 months. mostly calls from consumers to businesses and the results show that people in the buckeye state wear more often. maryland and new jersey were next on the list. meantime people in washington state are the least likely to let a four letter word fly. >> nice. >> now back to willie and al. >> down in math and reading but we're up in swearing. fantastic. coming up next, the daily habits putting you at risk for the flu. >> all that after your [ laughter ] he loves me. he loves me not. he loves me. he loves me not. ♪ he l
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